Linux Bash Colors




To change the directory and file colors, edit your .bashrc
vi ~/.bashrc
Add the following:
LS_COLORS=$LS_COLORS:’di=0;93′:’fi=0;37′ 
export LS_COLORS

The first number is the style, 0=default and 1=bold
The second number is the color, for di 93=yellow
Example:
directory style and color ‘di=0;93’
file style and color ‘fi=0;37’

Colors for other files, use these prefix:
(example: ‘fi=0;93’)
di = directory
fi = file
ln = symbolic link
mi = non-existent file pointed to by a symbolic link (visible when you type ls -l)
ex = file which is executable (ie. has ‘x’ set in permissions).
*.rpm = files with the ending .rpm

Style:
0 = default colour
1 = bold
4 = underlined
5 = flashing text
7 = reverse field
40 = black background
41 = red background
42 = green background
43 = orange background
44 = blue background
45 = purple background
46 = cyan background
47 = grey background
100 = dark grey background
101 = light red background
102 = light green background
103 = yellow background
104 = light blue background
105 = light purple background
106 = turquoise background

Colors:
31 = red
32 = green
33 = orange
34 = blue
35 = purple
36 = cyan
37 = grey
90 = dark grey
91 = light red
92 = light green
93 = yellow
94 = light blue
95 = light purple
96 = turquoise

To change the vim colors, select a color scheme in the directory /usr/share/vim/vim74/colors and add it to your .vimrc
Example:
:color pablo



Published by

Ferdy Mañago

Portland, Oregon